Session

Mechatronics, Engineering and Robotics

Description

The most fundamental human needs of water are for drinking, cooking and personal hygiene. In order to fulfill these needs, the quality of the water used should cause no risk to human health. The quality of the water in nature also affects the condition of ecosystems all living organisms depend on. At the same time, humans use water bodies as convenient sinks for the disposal of domestic, industrial and agricultural wastewaters. This, of course, degrades the quality of those water bodies. Water resources management involves the monitoring and management of water quality as much as the monitoring and management of water quantity. Various models have been developed to assist in predicting the water quality impacts of alternative land and water management policies and practices. This research provides a pricing framework for decision-makers that will help in the development of strategies for water quality management. However, trading schemes can be complex to set up with factors such as the number of facilities involved in the scheme and the variety of the pollutants discharged influencing the complexity. Success depends upon achieving a balance between the environmental benefits of improving water quality and administration costs. In Europe the drive to improve water quality under the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) encourages European citizens to get involved in improving water quality. Following recommendations from the IPCC3, the WFD aims to prevent and control emissions into water. Implementation of trading schemes could contribute to these goals.

Keywords:

mathematical models, Tirana-Ishmi, basin, TDML, environmental protection, GIS

Proceedings Editor

Edmond Hajrizi & Mo Vaziri

First Page

452

Last Page

457

Location

Prishtina, Kosovo

Start Date

2-11-2012 9:00 AM

End Date

3-11-2012 5:00 PM

Share

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Nov 2nd, 9:00 AM Nov 3rd, 5:00 PM

Water resources systems planning and management

Prishtina, Kosovo

The most fundamental human needs of water are for drinking, cooking and personal hygiene. In order to fulfill these needs, the quality of the water used should cause no risk to human health. The quality of the water in nature also affects the condition of ecosystems all living organisms depend on. At the same time, humans use water bodies as convenient sinks for the disposal of domestic, industrial and agricultural wastewaters. This, of course, degrades the quality of those water bodies. Water resources management involves the monitoring and management of water quality as much as the monitoring and management of water quantity. Various models have been developed to assist in predicting the water quality impacts of alternative land and water management policies and practices. This research provides a pricing framework for decision-makers that will help in the development of strategies for water quality management. However, trading schemes can be complex to set up with factors such as the number of facilities involved in the scheme and the variety of the pollutants discharged influencing the complexity. Success depends upon achieving a balance between the environmental benefits of improving water quality and administration costs. In Europe the drive to improve water quality under the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) encourages European citizens to get involved in improving water quality. Following recommendations from the IPCC3, the WFD aims to prevent and control emissions into water. Implementation of trading schemes could contribute to these goals.