Event Title

Nonmelanotic Skin Cancer of the Face and Their Treatment

Session

Medical, Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences

Description

Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and Squamos cell carcinoma (SCC) are the most common form of skin cancer. They can occur anywhere on the body, but are most common on areas that are exposed to the sun, such as your face, head, neck and ears or in skin areas where burns, scars or ulcers have damaged the skin. They are more common in men than women. The prognosis for patients this pathology is excellent, but if the disease is allowed to progress, it can cause significant morbidity. They grow very slowly. If they are treated earlier defect can be closed very easily with direct closure. If not treated in time they continue to grow wide and deep, destroying skin tissue and bone, loss of the eye, ear, nose, lip, they can lead to devastating cosmetic and functional deficits with resultant psychological, physical, and nutritional detriment. Local flaps have been commonly used in the reconstruction of small facial defects left after excision of primary tumors. However, larger defects often present a surgical difficulty and may necessitate free flaps. In the repair of such large defects, multiple local flaps may prove to be a viable and satisfactory alternative. Facial defects can be managed with the correct choice of local flap. Local flaps being easy to harvest and handle, provide good results due to good matching of the skin in terms of color, texture, and thickness.

Keywords:

skin cancer, maxillofacial surgery

Session Chair

Burim Kiseri

Session Co-Chair

Vjosa Hamiti Krasniqi

Proceedings Editor

Edmond Hajrizi

ISBN

978-9951-437-54-7

Location

Durres, Albania

Start Date

28-10-2017 5:45 PM

End Date

28-10-2017 6:15 PM

DOI

10.33107/ubt-ic.2017.306

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Oct 28th, 5:45 PM Oct 28th, 6:15 PM

Nonmelanotic Skin Cancer of the Face and Their Treatment

Durres, Albania

Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and Squamos cell carcinoma (SCC) are the most common form of skin cancer. They can occur anywhere on the body, but are most common on areas that are exposed to the sun, such as your face, head, neck and ears or in skin areas where burns, scars or ulcers have damaged the skin. They are more common in men than women. The prognosis for patients this pathology is excellent, but if the disease is allowed to progress, it can cause significant morbidity. They grow very slowly. If they are treated earlier defect can be closed very easily with direct closure. If not treated in time they continue to grow wide and deep, destroying skin tissue and bone, loss of the eye, ear, nose, lip, they can lead to devastating cosmetic and functional deficits with resultant psychological, physical, and nutritional detriment. Local flaps have been commonly used in the reconstruction of small facial defects left after excision of primary tumors. However, larger defects often present a surgical difficulty and may necessitate free flaps. In the repair of such large defects, multiple local flaps may prove to be a viable and satisfactory alternative. Facial defects can be managed with the correct choice of local flap. Local flaps being easy to harvest and handle, provide good results due to good matching of the skin in terms of color, texture, and thickness.