Event Title

Teacher talking time vs Student talking time: Encouraging speaking in the EFL classroom

Session

Education and Development

Description

The main aim of an English class revolves mainly around preparing students for a fluent communication. Consequently, the program of these classes should be designed and directed in the way that students are given the chance to practice it as much as possible. However, the biggest number of traditional classrooms tend to follow theories and concepts in which the teacher is the center of attention, by providing second language input leaving a little space for students to practice their English within the class session. This study embraces the studies of some authors with a more traditional viewpoints suggesting that the role of Teacher Talking Time (TTT) is crucial because of the input that is provided to the students. However, this research paper aims promoting and stating the importance that Student Talking Time (STT) and the role that it plays in the acquisition of Second Language. What is more, there are many studies that show how Teacher Talking Time (TTT) had a counter effect and that teachers should reduce it for a number of reasons. Therefore, the main purpose of this paper is to analyze this issue, to explain the roles of STT and TTT, to show the difference between these two favoring a higher amount of STT over TTT and the positive uses of it, and also tries to contribute to the field by suggesting some strategies and activities related to reducing TTT and encouraging the amount of STT that takes place in the EFL classrooms. In overall, the idea is that since students are the ones whose speaking opportunities are limited to a considerable degree, the time teachers speak in a class of English as a foreign language should decrease in order to provide more time for students to participate actively in classes.

Keywords:

teacher talking time, students talking time, encouraging speaking, fluency

Session Chair

Silvishah Miftari Goodspeed

Session Co-Chair

Halil Bashota

Proceedings Editor

Edmond Hajrizi

ISBN

978-9951-437-69-1

Location

Pristina, Kosovo

Start Date

27-10-2018 1:30 PM

End Date

27-10-2018 3:00 PM

DOI

10.33107/ubt-ic.2018.133

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Oct 27th, 1:30 PM Oct 27th, 3:00 PM

Teacher talking time vs Student talking time: Encouraging speaking in the EFL classroom

Pristina, Kosovo

The main aim of an English class revolves mainly around preparing students for a fluent communication. Consequently, the program of these classes should be designed and directed in the way that students are given the chance to practice it as much as possible. However, the biggest number of traditional classrooms tend to follow theories and concepts in which the teacher is the center of attention, by providing second language input leaving a little space for students to practice their English within the class session. This study embraces the studies of some authors with a more traditional viewpoints suggesting that the role of Teacher Talking Time (TTT) is crucial because of the input that is provided to the students. However, this research paper aims promoting and stating the importance that Student Talking Time (STT) and the role that it plays in the acquisition of Second Language. What is more, there are many studies that show how Teacher Talking Time (TTT) had a counter effect and that teachers should reduce it for a number of reasons. Therefore, the main purpose of this paper is to analyze this issue, to explain the roles of STT and TTT, to show the difference between these two favoring a higher amount of STT over TTT and the positive uses of it, and also tries to contribute to the field by suggesting some strategies and activities related to reducing TTT and encouraging the amount of STT that takes place in the EFL classrooms. In overall, the idea is that since students are the ones whose speaking opportunities are limited to a considerable degree, the time teachers speak in a class of English as a foreign language should decrease in order to provide more time for students to participate actively in classes.