Event Title

The relationship between executive functions and reading comprehension in children

Session

Education and Development

Description

Reading comprehension (RC) is a complex, dynamic process by which readers interact with text to construct meaning. It relies on lower level skills such as word decoding, fluency reading and vocabulary skills and also on higher level-skills such as inference making, literal comprehension and comprehension control. Many research studies have found relationship between reading comprehension and executive functions (Sesma, Mahone. Levine, Eason & Cutting, 2009, Cain & Oakhill, 2007, etc). Executive functions (EF) are a highly complex, interdependent group of abilities that are involved in governing an individual’s goal-directed behavior (Carroll et al, 2007). The main goal of this thesis was to examine the relationship between these higher level comprehension skills and domain general cognitive skills in young children. Findings from two studies of the thesis will be discussed in this paper.

Keywords:

mental model, higher-level comprehension skills, lower-level comprehension skills, executive functions, working memory

Session Chair

Fatbardha Qehaja

Session Co-Chair

Trendeline Haliti

Proceedings Editor

Edmond Hajrizi

ISBN

978-9951-437-69-1

Location

Pristina, Kosovo

Start Date

27-10-2018 10:45 AM

End Date

27-10-2018 12:15 PM

DOI

10.33107/ubt-ic.2018.141

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Oct 27th, 10:45 AM Oct 27th, 12:15 PM

The relationship between executive functions and reading comprehension in children

Pristina, Kosovo

Reading comprehension (RC) is a complex, dynamic process by which readers interact with text to construct meaning. It relies on lower level skills such as word decoding, fluency reading and vocabulary skills and also on higher level-skills such as inference making, literal comprehension and comprehension control. Many research studies have found relationship between reading comprehension and executive functions (Sesma, Mahone. Levine, Eason & Cutting, 2009, Cain & Oakhill, 2007, etc). Executive functions (EF) are a highly complex, interdependent group of abilities that are involved in governing an individual’s goal-directed behavior (Carroll et al, 2007). The main goal of this thesis was to examine the relationship between these higher level comprehension skills and domain general cognitive skills in young children. Findings from two studies of the thesis will be discussed in this paper.