Event Title

Challenges in Medical Robotics, Prosthetics and Artificial Organs

Session

Mechatronics, System Engineering and Robotics

Description

Robotics is a very advanced technology that tries to develop robots for different applications. Although robots have certain limitations in how they are built, people are able to use them perfectly. Robots similar to humans and pets are always considered companions and friends. The purpose of the robotic prosthetic is to replace a part of the missing or functionally damaged body with a piece of robotic body that completely replaces the function of the lost body part. Surgical robots are widespread in surgery because they are mainly involved in improving the quality of surgical procedures and the accuracy with which surgery is performed. Field and service robots face specific and important challenges. The first challenge is that the robot must act and move in a complex and changing environment. The second challenge for these types of robots is that they should act safely in the presence of people. In the robotic study, we are constantly concerned about the location of objects in the three-dimensional space. These objects are the manipulator links, the parts and tools are handling, and other objects in the manipulator environment. At a crude but significant level, these objects are described by only two attributes: position and orientation. Of course, a topic of immediate interest is the way we represent these quantities and manipulate them mathematically. Unlike computers, who deal with digital information, robots have to deal with the physical world as well. The material world is messy. Today's robots are good at following clear, recurring and logical instructions. They are not as good at treating unstructured environments or improvising new methods. The physics of processes that the robot performs can also bring significant challenges to their distribution. Unlike most devices that are designed to be used by a human operator, robots are increasingly being built to function within a human environment and are becoming increasingly humanoid.

Keywords:

Robot, Object, Body, Surgery, Environment

Session Chair

Peter Kopacek

Session Co-Chair

Ines Bula

Proceedings Editor

Edmond Hajrizi

ISBN

978-9951-437-69-1

Location

Pristina, Kosovo

Start Date

27-10-2018 1:30 PM

End Date

27-10-2018 3:00 PM

DOI

10.33107/ubt-ic.2018.333

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Oct 27th, 1:30 PM Oct 27th, 3:00 PM

Challenges in Medical Robotics, Prosthetics and Artificial Organs

Pristina, Kosovo

Robotics is a very advanced technology that tries to develop robots for different applications. Although robots have certain limitations in how they are built, people are able to use them perfectly. Robots similar to humans and pets are always considered companions and friends. The purpose of the robotic prosthetic is to replace a part of the missing or functionally damaged body with a piece of robotic body that completely replaces the function of the lost body part. Surgical robots are widespread in surgery because they are mainly involved in improving the quality of surgical procedures and the accuracy with which surgery is performed. Field and service robots face specific and important challenges. The first challenge is that the robot must act and move in a complex and changing environment. The second challenge for these types of robots is that they should act safely in the presence of people. In the robotic study, we are constantly concerned about the location of objects in the three-dimensional space. These objects are the manipulator links, the parts and tools are handling, and other objects in the manipulator environment. At a crude but significant level, these objects are described by only two attributes: position and orientation. Of course, a topic of immediate interest is the way we represent these quantities and manipulate them mathematically. Unlike computers, who deal with digital information, robots have to deal with the physical world as well. The material world is messy. Today's robots are good at following clear, recurring and logical instructions. They are not as good at treating unstructured environments or improvising new methods. The physics of processes that the robot performs can also bring significant challenges to their distribution. Unlike most devices that are designed to be used by a human operator, robots are increasingly being built to function within a human environment and are becoming increasingly humanoid.