Event Title

Chipboard Production: Simulation of the Gluing Process

Session

Mechatronics, System Engineering and Robotics

Description

The industrial manufacturing process of wood-based composites consists of several consecutive sub processes. The quality of the final product depends on the raw material and the different processing steps. To ensure a high quality of the product, while optimizing the use of energy and resources, adjustable process parameters need to be continuously adapted. Simulations of potential measures can predict the impact of these measures and hence avoid possible costs of rejects. This contribution concentrates on modelling and simulation of the gluing subprocess, most important for the quality of the final product. The wood particles are located in a mixer and thus are moved. Due to the position in the mixer, the particles have a local boundary condition. Their movement is locally limited (chips are located at the bottom of the mixer), unless they are transported upwards from the mixer. The resin (glue) is sprayed from above into the mixer using nozzles. The resin drops hit the moving wood particles. For modelling and simulation, an approach by cellular automata is used, with movements described on basis of lattice-gas cellular automata. The aim is to describe the movement and interactions of the wood and resin particles, which results in computing the resin distribution including penetration behaviour and lubrication effect. Appropriate geometries for resin particles and wood particles are introduced and different distributions of particle size are chosen. The rules for the different kinds of collisions between resin drops and wood chips, and between woodchips and woodchips are defined appropriately. In the case of a collision between wood and resin, a statistical distribution is used for calculating the quantity of resin, which penetrates, adheres and passes to another wood particle (lubrication effect). The contribution presents first results for a two-dimensional cellular automaton is used, with 280 woodchips, and 75.000 resin droplets.

Keywords:

cellular automata, particle movement, chipboard production, gluing process

Session Chair

Peter Kopacek

Session Co-Chair

Ines Bula

Proceedings Editor

Edmond Hajrizi

ISBN

978-9951-437-69-1

Location

Pristina, Kosovo

Start Date

27-10-2018 1:30 PM

End Date

27-10-2018 3:00 PM

DOI

10.33107/ubt-ic.2018.334

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Oct 27th, 1:30 PM Oct 27th, 3:00 PM

Chipboard Production: Simulation of the Gluing Process

Pristina, Kosovo

The industrial manufacturing process of wood-based composites consists of several consecutive sub processes. The quality of the final product depends on the raw material and the different processing steps. To ensure a high quality of the product, while optimizing the use of energy and resources, adjustable process parameters need to be continuously adapted. Simulations of potential measures can predict the impact of these measures and hence avoid possible costs of rejects. This contribution concentrates on modelling and simulation of the gluing subprocess, most important for the quality of the final product. The wood particles are located in a mixer and thus are moved. Due to the position in the mixer, the particles have a local boundary condition. Their movement is locally limited (chips are located at the bottom of the mixer), unless they are transported upwards from the mixer. The resin (glue) is sprayed from above into the mixer using nozzles. The resin drops hit the moving wood particles. For modelling and simulation, an approach by cellular automata is used, with movements described on basis of lattice-gas cellular automata. The aim is to describe the movement and interactions of the wood and resin particles, which results in computing the resin distribution including penetration behaviour and lubrication effect. Appropriate geometries for resin particles and wood particles are introduced and different distributions of particle size are chosen. The rules for the different kinds of collisions between resin drops and wood chips, and between woodchips and woodchips are defined appropriately. In the case of a collision between wood and resin, a statistical distribution is used for calculating the quantity of resin, which penetrates, adheres and passes to another wood particle (lubrication effect). The contribution presents first results for a two-dimensional cellular automaton is used, with 280 woodchips, and 75.000 resin droplets.