Event Title

A Nursing Approach in Albania for Transport of Injured Patient

Session

Medical, Dental and Pharmaceutical Sciences

Description

Prior to the 1960s, trauma transport was haphazard, as were trauma systems in general. Civilian prehospital transport had traditionally been provided by ground ambulance services which were generally operated by private funeral homes. Although many ambulance crews were trained and reputable, there are reports of some drivers who would arrive at a scene of an accident and prefer to pick up the dead because they were more likely to be paid.The movement of critically injured patients is potentially hazardous. However, significant improvements in transport safety and efficiency have occurred over the last decade chiefly because of the advances in resuscitation algorithms, training, and monitoring technology. On board resuscitation capabilities and transport logistics have also progressed. Because each phase of trauma management is improving, transport teams are being tasked with the transport of increasingly severe injuries. Three common themes emerge with all of these guidelines:

  • (i) patient transport always involves some degree of risk,
  • (ii) the benefits to be realized must outweigh these potential risks, and
  • (iii) during transport, the standards of care (especially monitoring) should be at the same level or higher than that provided in the setting from which the patient is being transported.

The level of care during transport should be equal to or exceed the level of care the patient is receiving prior to departure.

Keywords:

Nursing, Transportation of Injured Patients

Session Chair

Rexhep Gjyliqi

Session Co-Chair

Fitim Alidema

Proceedings Editor

Edmond Hajrizi

ISBN

978-9951-437-69-1

Location

Pristina, Kosovo

Start Date

27-10-2018 10:45 AM

End Date

27-10-2018 12:15 PM

DOI

10.33107/ubt-ic.2018.345

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Oct 27th, 10:45 AM Oct 27th, 12:15 PM

A Nursing Approach in Albania for Transport of Injured Patient

Pristina, Kosovo

Prior to the 1960s, trauma transport was haphazard, as were trauma systems in general. Civilian prehospital transport had traditionally been provided by ground ambulance services which were generally operated by private funeral homes. Although many ambulance crews were trained and reputable, there are reports of some drivers who would arrive at a scene of an accident and prefer to pick up the dead because they were more likely to be paid.The movement of critically injured patients is potentially hazardous. However, significant improvements in transport safety and efficiency have occurred over the last decade chiefly because of the advances in resuscitation algorithms, training, and monitoring technology. On board resuscitation capabilities and transport logistics have also progressed. Because each phase of trauma management is improving, transport teams are being tasked with the transport of increasingly severe injuries. Three common themes emerge with all of these guidelines:

  • (i) patient transport always involves some degree of risk,
  • (ii) the benefits to be realized must outweigh these potential risks, and
  • (iii) during transport, the standards of care (especially monitoring) should be at the same level or higher than that provided in the setting from which the patient is being transported.

The level of care during transport should be equal to or exceed the level of care the patient is receiving prior to departure.