Event Title

Increased Risk of Falling of Elderly Men

Session

Medical, Dental and Pharmaceutical Sciences

Description

Obesity is recognized as a major health problem in many parts of the world and the incidence of the condition is escalating at an alarming rate (1, 2). The global trend of increasing obesity indicates that current measures in preventing, treating and managing the condition are ineffective (3). Obesity significantly increases the risk of developing numerous medical conditions including hypertension, stroke, respiratory disease, type 2 diabetes, gout, osteoarthritis, certain cancers and various musculoskeletal disorders, particularly of the lower limbs and feet (4, 5). Despite significant advances in our knowledge and understanding of the multi-factorial nature of the condition, many questions regarding the specific consequences of the disease remain unanswered. The aim of this paper is to understand the effects of overweight or obesity on the lower limbs during a simple Counter Movement Jump and Squat Jump. It is one of the key issues that may challenge the overweight and obese when completing activities of daily living, including one the most fundamental of voluntary movement patterns, jumping, reversing a movement during a forward fall. Because of the scale of the problem of obesity and the relative paucity of information available, there is an urgent need to focus more attention on the physical consequences of repetitive loading of major structures, particularly the lower extremity. Community-dwelling elderly people 10 obese of average age of 58.6 years and 10 of normal weight of average age of 60.9 years, with no statistically significant differences. The measures were done using calibrated measuring appliances and standard methods of measuring. The height of subjects was measured in centimeters (cm) by height gauge to the nearest 0, 5 cm and body mass and weight was assessed in kilograms (kg) using the medical digital scales, with participants lightly dressed. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated using the formula: BMI = weight in kilograms divided by square of height in meters (kg/m2). We considered BMI as overweight when 25< BMI<30 kg/m2, and as obesity when BMI>30 kg/m2. The Waist circumference was measured to the nearest 0, 5 cm with a Gulick Handle in the level of the biiliac crestae. Muscle power was assessed during a standardized both-legs counter-movement jump performed on an Ergojump, a Bosco System licensed platform. The marked lower capacity for concentric contractions in obese man may result in an impaired performance, especially in activities where intense and rapid movements are essential, for example when reversing a forward fall. This may be one reason why obese elderly man are more prone to falls than normal weight men, due to this they try to walk slower and doing so they use less energy in their daily living with the result of more adipose tissue to carry during their life.

Keywords:

Obesity, Counter Movement Jump, Squat Jump

Session Chair

Rexhep Gjyliqi

Session Co-Chair

Fitim Alidema

Proceedings Editor

Edmond Hajrizi

ISBN

978-9951-437-69-1

Location

Pristina, Kosovo

Start Date

27-10-2018 10:45 AM

End Date

27-10-2018 12:15 PM

DOI

10.33107/ubt-ic.2018.365

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Oct 27th, 10:45 AM Oct 27th, 12:15 PM

Increased Risk of Falling of Elderly Men

Pristina, Kosovo

Obesity is recognized as a major health problem in many parts of the world and the incidence of the condition is escalating at an alarming rate (1, 2). The global trend of increasing obesity indicates that current measures in preventing, treating and managing the condition are ineffective (3). Obesity significantly increases the risk of developing numerous medical conditions including hypertension, stroke, respiratory disease, type 2 diabetes, gout, osteoarthritis, certain cancers and various musculoskeletal disorders, particularly of the lower limbs and feet (4, 5). Despite significant advances in our knowledge and understanding of the multi-factorial nature of the condition, many questions regarding the specific consequences of the disease remain unanswered. The aim of this paper is to understand the effects of overweight or obesity on the lower limbs during a simple Counter Movement Jump and Squat Jump. It is one of the key issues that may challenge the overweight and obese when completing activities of daily living, including one the most fundamental of voluntary movement patterns, jumping, reversing a movement during a forward fall. Because of the scale of the problem of obesity and the relative paucity of information available, there is an urgent need to focus more attention on the physical consequences of repetitive loading of major structures, particularly the lower extremity. Community-dwelling elderly people 10 obese of average age of 58.6 years and 10 of normal weight of average age of 60.9 years, with no statistically significant differences. The measures were done using calibrated measuring appliances and standard methods of measuring. The height of subjects was measured in centimeters (cm) by height gauge to the nearest 0, 5 cm and body mass and weight was assessed in kilograms (kg) using the medical digital scales, with participants lightly dressed. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated using the formula: BMI = weight in kilograms divided by square of height in meters (kg/m2). We considered BMI as overweight when 25< BMI<30 kg/m2, and as obesity when BMI>30 kg/m2. The Waist circumference was measured to the nearest 0, 5 cm with a Gulick Handle in the level of the biiliac crestae. Muscle power was assessed during a standardized both-legs counter-movement jump performed on an Ergojump, a Bosco System licensed platform. The marked lower capacity for concentric contractions in obese man may result in an impaired performance, especially in activities where intense and rapid movements are essential, for example when reversing a forward fall. This may be one reason why obese elderly man are more prone to falls than normal weight men, due to this they try to walk slower and doing so they use less energy in their daily living with the result of more adipose tissue to carry during their life.