Event Title

Leadership in between media policies and political media

Session

Political Science

Description

Political leadership had a key role in Kosovo’s transition towards democracy during the past decades. Dominant leaders in power during this period originated from their involvement in the conflict and were indoctrinated from monist ideology. Their vicennial journey, from anonymity to power, was helped by their influence in media policies, which created political media instead of the so called “forth state/power”. Post-war liberators used their conflict involvement as moral and patriotic capital to establish influence on media. In charge and financially empowered, political leadership developed media policies in service of themselves rather than public interest. Public media became a tool, by infiltrating party individuals through legal channels into decision-making positions in RTK; meanwhile dependent private media was supported financially in different ways, especially using public funds. In the context of numerous public policies, media policies took the causality character of political media that is more in the service of political leadership than of the public interest.

Keywords:

Leadership, media, power, public interest

Session Chair

Armend Muja

Session Co-Chair

Bekim Baliqi & Dritëro Arifi

Proceedings Editor

Edmond Hajrizi

ISBN

978-9951-437-69-1

Location

Pristina, Kosovo

Start Date

27-10-2018 3:15 PM

End Date

27-10-2018 4:45 PM

DOI

10.33107/ubt-ic.2018.397

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Oct 27th, 3:15 PM Oct 27th, 4:45 PM

Leadership in between media policies and political media

Pristina, Kosovo

Political leadership had a key role in Kosovo’s transition towards democracy during the past decades. Dominant leaders in power during this period originated from their involvement in the conflict and were indoctrinated from monist ideology. Their vicennial journey, from anonymity to power, was helped by their influence in media policies, which created political media instead of the so called “forth state/power”. Post-war liberators used their conflict involvement as moral and patriotic capital to establish influence on media. In charge and financially empowered, political leadership developed media policies in service of themselves rather than public interest. Public media became a tool, by infiltrating party individuals through legal channels into decision-making positions in RTK; meanwhile dependent private media was supported financially in different ways, especially using public funds. In the context of numerous public policies, media policies took the causality character of political media that is more in the service of political leadership than of the public interest.