Event Title

Macedonia and Kosovo should treat air pollution as a national security threat

Session

Political Science

Description

This paper argues that societies in Macedonia and Kosovo should treat air pollution as a matter of national security. It uses the international relations theory of constructivism as a starting point. Specifically, we are using the theory of 'securitization' and the social construction of national security threats to craft the policy recommendations for the countries. In order to make the case for the 'securitization of air pollution' this paper offers three levels of analysis. Primarily, it explores the consequences of air pollution and offers an overview of current attempts in both countries to tackle the problem. Secondly, the paper dives into the theory of 'securitization', and examines how this theory has been used when states want to 'classify' an issue as a 'threat' and consequently treat it as a matter of national security. Finally, we argue in favor of treating air-pollution as a matter of national security, and we analyse the opportunities that this approach can provide for a more holistic societal response to the challenge.

Keywords:

Air pollution, national security, securitization

Session Chair

Ridvan Peshkopia

Session Co-Chair

Velizar Shalamanov & Sabri Kiçmari

Proceedings Editor

Edmond Hajrizi

ISBN

978-9951-437-69-1

Location

Pristina, Kosovo

Start Date

27-10-2018 10:45 AM

End Date

27-10-2018 12:15 PM

DOI

10.33107/ubt-ic.2018.398

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Oct 27th, 10:45 AM Oct 27th, 12:15 PM

Macedonia and Kosovo should treat air pollution as a national security threat

Pristina, Kosovo

This paper argues that societies in Macedonia and Kosovo should treat air pollution as a matter of national security. It uses the international relations theory of constructivism as a starting point. Specifically, we are using the theory of 'securitization' and the social construction of national security threats to craft the policy recommendations for the countries. In order to make the case for the 'securitization of air pollution' this paper offers three levels of analysis. Primarily, it explores the consequences of air pollution and offers an overview of current attempts in both countries to tackle the problem. Secondly, the paper dives into the theory of 'securitization', and examines how this theory has been used when states want to 'classify' an issue as a 'threat' and consequently treat it as a matter of national security. Finally, we argue in favor of treating air-pollution as a matter of national security, and we analyse the opportunities that this approach can provide for a more holistic societal response to the challenge.