Event Title

The Effect of Bilingualism in Children’s Ability to Solve a Perspective – Taking Task

Session

Psychology

Description

Previous research has demonstrated that bilingualism contributes to cognitive advantages in nonverbal tasks. This study examines whether these cognitive advantages extend to spatial problems, more precisely the perspective-taking task. Fourteen bilingual and 14 monolingual third-grade children were compared on their ability to solve a perspective-taking task, which required them to imagine what an observer would see from a viewpoint that was different from their own. The background measures showed that children from both groups had similar cognitive functioning. In perspective-taking, the main difference was found in the comparison of different trials. Bilinguals were more consistent across all trials, while monolinguals showed more variability. Generally, monolinguals made more errors than bilinguals, especially in conditions that involved the most conflict.

Keywords:

Bilingualism, monolinguals, children, spatial cognition, perspective-taking task

Session Chair

Violeta Zefi

Session Co-Chair

Ibrahim Neziri

Proceedings Editor

Edmond Hajrizi

ISBN

978-9951-437-69-1

Location

Pristina, Kosovo

Start Date

27-10-2018 10:45 AM

End Date

27-10-2018 12:15 PM

DOI

10.33107/ubt-ic.2018.421

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Oct 27th, 10:45 AM Oct 27th, 12:15 PM

The Effect of Bilingualism in Children’s Ability to Solve a Perspective – Taking Task

Pristina, Kosovo

Previous research has demonstrated that bilingualism contributes to cognitive advantages in nonverbal tasks. This study examines whether these cognitive advantages extend to spatial problems, more precisely the perspective-taking task. Fourteen bilingual and 14 monolingual third-grade children were compared on their ability to solve a perspective-taking task, which required them to imagine what an observer would see from a viewpoint that was different from their own. The background measures showed that children from both groups had similar cognitive functioning. In perspective-taking, the main difference was found in the comparison of different trials. Bilinguals were more consistent across all trials, while monolinguals showed more variability. Generally, monolinguals made more errors than bilinguals, especially in conditions that involved the most conflict.