Event Title

Aspects of Diplomatic Relations between England and Albania before and after Corfu Channel Crisis

Session

Political Science

Description

The underling purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive panorama of peculiar aspects concerning diplomatic relations between Albania and Britain before and after Corfu Channel Incident. Among others this paper elaborates key aspects of diplomatic relations between Britain and Albania before and after the Second World War. Indeed there have been found evidences that British officers admit that the relations between them and Albanian authorities were mainly characterized by a lack of trustworthiness devoid of the fact that they were allies and were fighting to attain a common goal against fascism and Nazism. Generally speaking the paper intents to analyze the positive as well as multifaceted collaboration between those countries against the common enemy Nazism and the rapid aggravation of relations between them after Albanian Labor Party come into power. The countries were soon at odds to each for numerous reasons concerned with having different ideologies, spheres of interest and regimes. The disputes between countries worsened even further after the reign Albanian Communist Regime which would metaphorically resemble to an “impenetrable shell”. The paper will primarily focus on these elements which at a large extent triggered and culminated with the Corfu Channel Incident. First and Foremost British Government was reluctant to recognize post-war Albanian government on grounds of lack of free elections; refusal of Albanian authorities to accept the aid of UNRRA was also condemned by British Government and to make the matter worse Albanian government request to be invited in the Conference of San Francisco of UNO in 1945 was simultaneously refused for three times. Undoubtedly these may be considered some negative aspects, which anticipated the upcoming developments and spurred the first sparkles of the Cold War in Balkans.

Keywords:

Corfu Channel, British troops, diplomatic relations

Session Chair

Labinot Greiçevci

Proceedings Editor

Edmond Hajrizi

ISBN

978-9951-550-19-2

Location

Pristina, Kosovo

Start Date

26-10-2019 12:00 PM

End Date

26-10-2019 12:30 PM

DOI

10.33107/ubt-ic.2019.105

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Oct 26th, 12:00 PM Oct 26th, 12:30 PM

Aspects of Diplomatic Relations between England and Albania before and after Corfu Channel Crisis

Pristina, Kosovo

The underling purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive panorama of peculiar aspects concerning diplomatic relations between Albania and Britain before and after Corfu Channel Incident. Among others this paper elaborates key aspects of diplomatic relations between Britain and Albania before and after the Second World War. Indeed there have been found evidences that British officers admit that the relations between them and Albanian authorities were mainly characterized by a lack of trustworthiness devoid of the fact that they were allies and were fighting to attain a common goal against fascism and Nazism. Generally speaking the paper intents to analyze the positive as well as multifaceted collaboration between those countries against the common enemy Nazism and the rapid aggravation of relations between them after Albanian Labor Party come into power. The countries were soon at odds to each for numerous reasons concerned with having different ideologies, spheres of interest and regimes. The disputes between countries worsened even further after the reign Albanian Communist Regime which would metaphorically resemble to an “impenetrable shell”. The paper will primarily focus on these elements which at a large extent triggered and culminated with the Corfu Channel Incident. First and Foremost British Government was reluctant to recognize post-war Albanian government on grounds of lack of free elections; refusal of Albanian authorities to accept the aid of UNRRA was also condemned by British Government and to make the matter worse Albanian government request to be invited in the Conference of San Francisco of UNO in 1945 was simultaneously refused for three times. Undoubtedly these may be considered some negative aspects, which anticipated the upcoming developments and spurred the first sparkles of the Cold War in Balkans.