Event Title

Multi-omics analysis of serum samples demonstrates reprogramming of organ functions via systemic calcium mobilization and platelet activation in metastatic melanoma

Session

Medicine and Nursing

Description

Pathophysiologies of cancer-associated syndroms such as cachexia are poorly understood and no routine biomarkers have been established, yet. Using shotgun proteomics, known marker molecules including PMEL, CRP, SAA and CSPG4 were found deregulated in patients with metastatic melanoma. Targeted analysis of 58 selected proteins with multiple reaction monitoring was applied for independent data verification. In three patients, two of which suffered from cachexia, a tissue damage signature was determined, consisting of nine proteins, PLTP, CD14, TIMP1, S10A8, S10A9, GP1BA, PTPRJ, CD44 and C4A, as well as increased levels of glycine and asparagine, and decreased levels of polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholine concentrations, as determined by targeted metabolomics. Remarkably, these molecules are known to be involved in key processes of cancer cachexia. Based on these results, we propose a model how metastatic melanoma may lead to reprogramming of organ functions via formation of platelet activating factors from long-chain polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines under oxidative conditions and via systemic induction of intracellular calcium mobilization. Calcium mobilization in platelets was demonstrated to alterate levels of several of these marker molecules. Additionally, platelets from melanoma patients proved to be in a rather exhausted state, and platelet-derived eicosanoids implicated in tumor growth were found massively increased in blood from three melanoma patients. Platelets were thus identified as important source of serum protein and lipid alterations in late stage melanoma patients. As a result, the proposed model describes the crosstalk between lipolysis of fat tissue and muscle wasting mediated by oxidative stress, resulting in the metabolic deregulations characteristic for cachexia.

Session Chair

Besnik Elshani

Session Co-Chair

Ilir Ahmetgjekaj

Proceedings Editor

Edmond Hajrizi

ISBN

978-9951-550-19-2

Location

Pristina, Kosovo

Start Date

26-10-2019 11:00 AM

End Date

26-10-2019 12:30 PM

DOI

10.33107/ubt-ic.2019.292

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Oct 26th, 11:00 AM Oct 26th, 12:30 PM

Multi-omics analysis of serum samples demonstrates reprogramming of organ functions via systemic calcium mobilization and platelet activation in metastatic melanoma

Pristina, Kosovo

Pathophysiologies of cancer-associated syndroms such as cachexia are poorly understood and no routine biomarkers have been established, yet. Using shotgun proteomics, known marker molecules including PMEL, CRP, SAA and CSPG4 were found deregulated in patients with metastatic melanoma. Targeted analysis of 58 selected proteins with multiple reaction monitoring was applied for independent data verification. In three patients, two of which suffered from cachexia, a tissue damage signature was determined, consisting of nine proteins, PLTP, CD14, TIMP1, S10A8, S10A9, GP1BA, PTPRJ, CD44 and C4A, as well as increased levels of glycine and asparagine, and decreased levels of polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholine concentrations, as determined by targeted metabolomics. Remarkably, these molecules are known to be involved in key processes of cancer cachexia. Based on these results, we propose a model how metastatic melanoma may lead to reprogramming of organ functions via formation of platelet activating factors from long-chain polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines under oxidative conditions and via systemic induction of intracellular calcium mobilization. Calcium mobilization in platelets was demonstrated to alterate levels of several of these marker molecules. Additionally, platelets from melanoma patients proved to be in a rather exhausted state, and platelet-derived eicosanoids implicated in tumor growth were found massively increased in blood from three melanoma patients. Platelets were thus identified as important source of serum protein and lipid alterations in late stage melanoma patients. As a result, the proposed model describes the crosstalk between lipolysis of fat tissue and muscle wasting mediated by oxidative stress, resulting in the metabolic deregulations characteristic for cachexia.