Event Title

Health Needs and Fears of Patients with Diabetes: A Qualitative Research

Session

Medicine and Nursing

Description

Introduction: Diabetes is a serious, chronic disease that occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin (a hormone that regulates blood glucose), or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. Raised blood glucose, a common effect of uncontrolled diabetes, may, over time, lead to serious damage to the heart, blood vessels, eyes, kidneys and nerves. More than 400 million people live with diabetes. Globally, an estimated 422 million adults were living with diabetes in 2014, compared to 108 million in 1980. The global prevalence (age-standardized) of diabetes has nearly doubled since 1980, rising from 4.7% to 8.5% in the adult population.

Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the health needs and fears among the patients with Diabetes Mellitus especially those who use insulin. Moreover, the purpose was to determine the fears experienced by the patients from the time they were diagnosed and self-management problems.

Methodology: The motivation for doing qualitative research, as opposed to quantitative research, comes from the observation that, if there is one thing, which distinguishes humans from the natural world, it is (our) ability to talk. As qualitative research is involved here, generalizations are not intended. Attention focuses on how a phenomenon is unveiled and the surrounding world is questioned. Sixteen (9 women and 7 men) insulin-dependent patients, expressed their fears and health needs. The recruiting took place in a remote area of Kosova (patients asked not to mention the exact area).

Results: The results showed that patients have a different fears and needs associated with the diagnosis, treatment, and everyday life in the self-management of the disease. Most patients express the needs as wishes. They also point out to expect more nurses in helping them to prevent hypoglycemia, and get more health education concerning diabetes.

Conclusion: Type I Diabetes Mellitus patients expressed their worries about being in the dark concerning health education regarding their disease, psychological needs in their everyday life. There is an immediate need for specialized nurses, since because of their expertise, these specialized nurses should not only educate patients but they should also educate other nurses and even doctors. The importance diabetes nurses place on individualized nursing practice should be reflected throughout the nursing care of diabetes patients.

Keywords:

diabetes mellitus, fears, health needs, self-care, nursing care

Session Chair

Xhevat Kurhasani

Session Co-Chair

Valdete Alidema Serreqi

Proceedings Editor

Edmond Hajrizi

ISBN

978-9951-550-19-2

Location

Pristina, Kosovo

Start Date

26-10-2019 1:30 PM

End Date

26-10-2019 3:00 PM

DOI

10.33107/ubt-ic.2019.308

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Oct 26th, 1:30 PM Oct 26th, 3:00 PM

Health Needs and Fears of Patients with Diabetes: A Qualitative Research

Pristina, Kosovo

Introduction: Diabetes is a serious, chronic disease that occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin (a hormone that regulates blood glucose), or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. Raised blood glucose, a common effect of uncontrolled diabetes, may, over time, lead to serious damage to the heart, blood vessels, eyes, kidneys and nerves. More than 400 million people live with diabetes. Globally, an estimated 422 million adults were living with diabetes in 2014, compared to 108 million in 1980. The global prevalence (age-standardized) of diabetes has nearly doubled since 1980, rising from 4.7% to 8.5% in the adult population.

Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the health needs and fears among the patients with Diabetes Mellitus especially those who use insulin. Moreover, the purpose was to determine the fears experienced by the patients from the time they were diagnosed and self-management problems.

Methodology: The motivation for doing qualitative research, as opposed to quantitative research, comes from the observation that, if there is one thing, which distinguishes humans from the natural world, it is (our) ability to talk. As qualitative research is involved here, generalizations are not intended. Attention focuses on how a phenomenon is unveiled and the surrounding world is questioned. Sixteen (9 women and 7 men) insulin-dependent patients, expressed their fears and health needs. The recruiting took place in a remote area of Kosova (patients asked not to mention the exact area).

Results: The results showed that patients have a different fears and needs associated with the diagnosis, treatment, and everyday life in the self-management of the disease. Most patients express the needs as wishes. They also point out to expect more nurses in helping them to prevent hypoglycemia, and get more health education concerning diabetes.

Conclusion: Type I Diabetes Mellitus patients expressed their worries about being in the dark concerning health education regarding their disease, psychological needs in their everyday life. There is an immediate need for specialized nurses, since because of their expertise, these specialized nurses should not only educate patients but they should also educate other nurses and even doctors. The importance diabetes nurses place on individualized nursing practice should be reflected throughout the nursing care of diabetes patients.