Event Title

The Impact of Human Capital on Technology-Intensive Exports, with Special Reference to Transition Economies of Central and Eastern Europe

Session

Management, Business and Economics

Description

This paper examines the impact of human capital on technology-intensive exports from 27 European countries, with special reference to transition economies of Central and Eastern Europe. The empirical investigation makes use of various human capital and technology-intensive export measures which allows the drawing of more comprehensive inference. To assess the robustness of the results, a diversified modelling strategy is employed. The empirical assessment provides sufficient evidence to support the hypothesized positive link between the share of population who have attained tertiary education and the share of medium and high-technology exports for the full sample of countries, the effect being relatively stronger for the high-technology category. When transition and non-transition economies are assessed separately, the empirical evidence is mixed. The findings from the export sophistication analysis appear to support the importance of the share of population with tertiary education for the export sophistication of non-transition economies only. Some supporting evidence is also found for the positive role of the quality of education.

Keywords:

Technology-intensive exports, Human Capital, Transition Economies.

Session Chair

Edmond Hajrizi

Session Co-Chair

Naim Preniqi

Proceedings Editor

Edmond Hajrizi

ISBN

978-9951-550-19-2

Location

Pristina, Kosovo

Start Date

26-10-2019 11:00 AM

End Date

26-10-2019 12:30 PM

DOI

10.33107/ubt-ic.2019.329

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Oct 26th, 11:00 AM Oct 26th, 12:30 PM

The Impact of Human Capital on Technology-Intensive Exports, with Special Reference to Transition Economies of Central and Eastern Europe

Pristina, Kosovo

This paper examines the impact of human capital on technology-intensive exports from 27 European countries, with special reference to transition economies of Central and Eastern Europe. The empirical investigation makes use of various human capital and technology-intensive export measures which allows the drawing of more comprehensive inference. To assess the robustness of the results, a diversified modelling strategy is employed. The empirical assessment provides sufficient evidence to support the hypothesized positive link between the share of population who have attained tertiary education and the share of medium and high-technology exports for the full sample of countries, the effect being relatively stronger for the high-technology category. When transition and non-transition economies are assessed separately, the empirical evidence is mixed. The findings from the export sophistication analysis appear to support the importance of the share of population with tertiary education for the export sophistication of non-transition economies only. Some supporting evidence is also found for the positive role of the quality of education.