Event Title

The Effect of Accepting External Influence on Emotional Labor: A Study on White-Collar Workers in Turkey

Session

Management, Business and Economics

Description

It was many years after Industrial Revolution that the threat child labor and working under inhumanitarian conditions poses as physical burden to laborers and the severity of the fact that they had to work for many hours under such ardous conditions were realized. However, as industry developed and the concept of being a laborer evolved into a task that requires emotional assets of laborers other than physical burden as well, the “emotional labor” of workers was started to be investigated as a concept. First brought up by American sociologist Arlie Hochschild in 1979 in her book “The Managed Heart” that discusses commercialization of human feelings, emotional labor was investigated on many concepts like gender, age, education status, and work sectors as the years passed. Emotional labor was defined as “white collar workers’ control of their emotions and them exhibiting the emotions their business owners demand for consumer satisfaction and positive relationships” between white collar workers and shareholders.

This study empirically investigated the role of accepting external influence, a factor of authenticity, on emotional labor among the white collar workers in Turkey. As service-oriented total quality management applications requires constant communication with colleagues, customers, suppliers, competitors, stakeholders, white collar workers are the ones that are being required to perform emotional labor and being exposed to face their authentic selves via accepting external influence or not. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of accepting external influence on emotional labor. Data was collected via Hospitality Emotional Labor Scale (HELS) developed by Chu and Murmann (2006), and The Authenticity Scale developed by Wood et. al. (2008). There are 201 participants, 126 were female and 75 were male who work in a variety of industries in Turkey. Analysis was conducted by the SPSS program.

Keywords:

Emotional labor, the role of accepting external influence, Authenticity, White-collar workers, Turkey.

Session Chair

Edmond Hajrizi

Session Co-Chair

Naim Preniqi

Proceedings Editor

Edmond Hajrizi

ISBN

978-9951-550-19-2

Location

Pristina, Kosovo

Start Date

26-10-2019 11:00 AM

End Date

26-10-2019 12:30 PM

DOI

10.33107/ubt-ic.2019.335

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Oct 26th, 11:00 AM Oct 26th, 12:30 PM

The Effect of Accepting External Influence on Emotional Labor: A Study on White-Collar Workers in Turkey

Pristina, Kosovo

It was many years after Industrial Revolution that the threat child labor and working under inhumanitarian conditions poses as physical burden to laborers and the severity of the fact that they had to work for many hours under such ardous conditions were realized. However, as industry developed and the concept of being a laborer evolved into a task that requires emotional assets of laborers other than physical burden as well, the “emotional labor” of workers was started to be investigated as a concept. First brought up by American sociologist Arlie Hochschild in 1979 in her book “The Managed Heart” that discusses commercialization of human feelings, emotional labor was investigated on many concepts like gender, age, education status, and work sectors as the years passed. Emotional labor was defined as “white collar workers’ control of their emotions and them exhibiting the emotions their business owners demand for consumer satisfaction and positive relationships” between white collar workers and shareholders.

This study empirically investigated the role of accepting external influence, a factor of authenticity, on emotional labor among the white collar workers in Turkey. As service-oriented total quality management applications requires constant communication with colleagues, customers, suppliers, competitors, stakeholders, white collar workers are the ones that are being required to perform emotional labor and being exposed to face their authentic selves via accepting external influence or not. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of accepting external influence on emotional labor. Data was collected via Hospitality Emotional Labor Scale (HELS) developed by Chu and Murmann (2006), and The Authenticity Scale developed by Wood et. al. (2008). There are 201 participants, 126 were female and 75 were male who work in a variety of industries in Turkey. Analysis was conducted by the SPSS program.