Event Title

Land fragmentation, agrobiodiversity and farm profits, Case in Kosovo

Session

Agriculture, Food Science and Technology

Description

The purpose of this study is to study how land fragmentation affects crop biodiversity and farm productivity. This study is based on empirical analysis of farms in Kosovo, based on a preliminary analysis we see that land fragmentation is inversely proportional to farm productivity, while land fragmentation productivity declines and vice versa. In our case with the analysis of 200 populations carried out at farm level, it is seen that land fragmentation increases biodiversity, which means that on one hand it increases the possibility of producing a large number of crops and meeting the community need, while on the other hand it reduces the possibility of applying the composition and determination for the development of strategic products for economic development. The results show us that farm/crop biodiversity plays an important role in farm profitability. Policies that aim to increase land consolidation and reduce fragmentation may overlook the positive link between biodiversity and farm profitability. Policies that encourage land consolidation should, therefore, consider the crucial role that this has on other variables such as farm biodiversity.

Keywords:

farm biodiversity, land fragmentation, profitability, farm productivity, Kosovo

Session Chair

Flutura Ajazi

Session Co-Chair

Imri Demelezi

Proceedings Editor

Edmond Hajrizi

ISBN

978-9951-550-19-2

Location

Pristina, Kosovo

Start Date

26-10-2019 3:30 PM

End Date

26-10-2019 5:00 PM

DOI

10.33107/ubt-ic.2019.421

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Oct 26th, 3:30 PM Oct 26th, 5:00 PM

Land fragmentation, agrobiodiversity and farm profits, Case in Kosovo

Pristina, Kosovo

The purpose of this study is to study how land fragmentation affects crop biodiversity and farm productivity. This study is based on empirical analysis of farms in Kosovo, based on a preliminary analysis we see that land fragmentation is inversely proportional to farm productivity, while land fragmentation productivity declines and vice versa. In our case with the analysis of 200 populations carried out at farm level, it is seen that land fragmentation increases biodiversity, which means that on one hand it increases the possibility of producing a large number of crops and meeting the community need, while on the other hand it reduces the possibility of applying the composition and determination for the development of strategic products for economic development. The results show us that farm/crop biodiversity plays an important role in farm profitability. Policies that aim to increase land consolidation and reduce fragmentation may overlook the positive link between biodiversity and farm profitability. Policies that encourage land consolidation should, therefore, consider the crucial role that this has on other variables such as farm biodiversity.