Event Title

Identity development in intercultural communication

Session

Journalism, Media and Communication

Description

Communication and transportation technologies continue to bring together different languages, religions, cultures, ethnicities, and nationalities, in an unprecedented scale in this huge interconnected network of interdependence, conflict, and common fate. As a result, we nowadays live in an era ripe with a clash of identities. Of paradoxical interest is the fact that the very forces that serve to dismantle physical, social, and cultural boundaries, also worsen group rivalries, painting a deep and irregular picture of the world of today. Intercultural communication is the value of offering people, but also the consequence of intolerance of cultural identities, and the “us-versus-them” mentality. Anthropologists see culture and ethnicity as a sort of temporary continuation or tradition which ties members to a common future, as reinforced by the models and practices of life in regards to language, conduct, behaviour, norms, beliefs, myths, and values as the shapes and practices of social institutions. Sociologists treat culture as a societal category with an ethnic element, defined by membership which varies from other groups due to a series of characteristics, qualities, or criteria, such as national origin, geography, language, religion, and race. Psychological studies, on the other hand, usually approach cultural identity in terms of one’s subjective orientation and attitudes towards one’s ethnic origin. A number of intercultural communication theories offer concepts of cultural identity which can be characterized as integrative in an ideological position. The interdependence of engagement, communication, the new needs of society cause for so-called “cultural exchange” to be offered “aggressively” until multiculturalism is reached, and in more in-depth cases, assimilation.

Keywords:

Communication, culture, multiculturalism, assimilation, language, race, religion, norms

Session Chair

Ferid Selimi

Session Co-Chair

Mimoza Hasani

Proceedings Editor

Edmond Hajrizi

ISBN

978-9951-437-96-7

Location

Lipjan, Kosovo

Start Date

31-10-2020 10:45 AM

End Date

31-10-2020 12:15 PM

DOI

10.33107/ubt-ic.2020.354

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Oct 31st, 10:45 AM Oct 31st, 12:15 PM

Identity development in intercultural communication

Lipjan, Kosovo

Communication and transportation technologies continue to bring together different languages, religions, cultures, ethnicities, and nationalities, in an unprecedented scale in this huge interconnected network of interdependence, conflict, and common fate. As a result, we nowadays live in an era ripe with a clash of identities. Of paradoxical interest is the fact that the very forces that serve to dismantle physical, social, and cultural boundaries, also worsen group rivalries, painting a deep and irregular picture of the world of today. Intercultural communication is the value of offering people, but also the consequence of intolerance of cultural identities, and the “us-versus-them” mentality. Anthropologists see culture and ethnicity as a sort of temporary continuation or tradition which ties members to a common future, as reinforced by the models and practices of life in regards to language, conduct, behaviour, norms, beliefs, myths, and values as the shapes and practices of social institutions. Sociologists treat culture as a societal category with an ethnic element, defined by membership which varies from other groups due to a series of characteristics, qualities, or criteria, such as national origin, geography, language, religion, and race. Psychological studies, on the other hand, usually approach cultural identity in terms of one’s subjective orientation and attitudes towards one’s ethnic origin. A number of intercultural communication theories offer concepts of cultural identity which can be characterized as integrative in an ideological position. The interdependence of engagement, communication, the new needs of society cause for so-called “cultural exchange” to be offered “aggressively” until multiculturalism is reached, and in more in-depth cases, assimilation.