Event Title

The consociational model of democracy in Kosovo in comparison to other regional and international cases

Session

Political Science

Description

This paper analyses in a critical manner the consociational model of democracy in post-war Kosovo since 1999.

In doing so, it uses as conceptual tools all four characteristics of the consociational model: (1) grand coalition, (2) cultural autonomy, (3) proportionality and (4) minority veto (Lijphart, 2008). The first part addresses in detail the theoretical aspect of the consociational model, in comparison to other alternative theoretical models (e.g., idea/model of ethnic partition of Horowitz 1985).

The second part outlines the concrete results and failures within this process. Ultimately, it will also depict the advantages and shortcomings of the consociational model of democracy promoted in post-war Kosovo. It will also try to locate eventual parallels with other neighbouring countries (e.g., Bosnia and Herzegovina, North Macedonia, and Serbia) and also wider at the international level.

The paper ends with summarising the key findings and their potential links with scholarly debates on the models and practices of democracy.

Proceedings Editor

Edmond Hajrizi

ISBN

978-9951-550-47-5

Location

UBT Kampus, Lipjan

Start Date

30-10-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

30-10-2021 12:00 AM

DOI

10.33107/ubt-ic.2021.259

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Oct 30th, 12:00 AM Oct 30th, 12:00 AM

The consociational model of democracy in Kosovo in comparison to other regional and international cases

UBT Kampus, Lipjan

This paper analyses in a critical manner the consociational model of democracy in post-war Kosovo since 1999.

In doing so, it uses as conceptual tools all four characteristics of the consociational model: (1) grand coalition, (2) cultural autonomy, (3) proportionality and (4) minority veto (Lijphart, 2008). The first part addresses in detail the theoretical aspect of the consociational model, in comparison to other alternative theoretical models (e.g., idea/model of ethnic partition of Horowitz 1985).

The second part outlines the concrete results and failures within this process. Ultimately, it will also depict the advantages and shortcomings of the consociational model of democracy promoted in post-war Kosovo. It will also try to locate eventual parallels with other neighbouring countries (e.g., Bosnia and Herzegovina, North Macedonia, and Serbia) and also wider at the international level.

The paper ends with summarising the key findings and their potential links with scholarly debates on the models and practices of democracy.