Event Title

Leadership Behavior and Its Impact on Teachers’ Work Engagement and Performance: A Basis for Capability Building Program

Presenter Information

Marialos Cortez Quitay

Session

Education and Development

Description

This study aimed to determine the leadership behavior exhibited by secondary school heads and its impact on teachers’ work engagement and performance of which results served as basis in the formulation of a capability building program designed to improve teachers’ work engagement and performance. The study made use of the descriptive – correlational research design. With reference to the measurement of school heads’ leadership behavior, a standardized questionnaire developed by Robert J. House was utilized. As to teachers’ work engagement, the researcher used Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES) developed by Schaufeli and Bakker. The respondents of the study were the 47 secondary school heads and 270 teachers of the Third Congressional District. The school heads were taken universally while the teachers were subjected to sampling. The study utilized percentage, weighted mean, Pearson r, and chi-square for its statistical treatment. The findings revealed that teachers’ performance based on the RPMS – IPCRF is “Very Satisfactory”. School heads exhibited the leadership behavior in terms of supportive, participative, and achievement – oriented at a “High” extent except the directive style, which they exhibited at a “Very High” extent. Secondary school heads are more on the directive style of leadership behavior. Teachers’ work engagement is “Very High”. School heads’ leadership behavior is significantly related to teachers’ work engagement and performance. Teacher’s sex and educational qualification are significantly related to their work engagement while teachers’ performance is significantly related to their civil status and educational qualification. Educational qualification was found to be consistently related to teachers’ work engagement and performance.

Keywords:

leadership behavior, work engagement, performance

Proceedings Editor

Edmond Hajrizi

ISBN

978-9951-550-47-5

Location

UBT Kampus, Lipjan

Start Date

30-10-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

30-10-2021 12:00 AM

DOI

10.33107/ubt-ic.2021.443

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Oct 30th, 12:00 AM Oct 30th, 12:00 AM

Leadership Behavior and Its Impact on Teachers’ Work Engagement and Performance: A Basis for Capability Building Program

UBT Kampus, Lipjan

This study aimed to determine the leadership behavior exhibited by secondary school heads and its impact on teachers’ work engagement and performance of which results served as basis in the formulation of a capability building program designed to improve teachers’ work engagement and performance. The study made use of the descriptive – correlational research design. With reference to the measurement of school heads’ leadership behavior, a standardized questionnaire developed by Robert J. House was utilized. As to teachers’ work engagement, the researcher used Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES) developed by Schaufeli and Bakker. The respondents of the study were the 47 secondary school heads and 270 teachers of the Third Congressional District. The school heads were taken universally while the teachers were subjected to sampling. The study utilized percentage, weighted mean, Pearson r, and chi-square for its statistical treatment. The findings revealed that teachers’ performance based on the RPMS – IPCRF is “Very Satisfactory”. School heads exhibited the leadership behavior in terms of supportive, participative, and achievement – oriented at a “High” extent except the directive style, which they exhibited at a “Very High” extent. Secondary school heads are more on the directive style of leadership behavior. Teachers’ work engagement is “Very High”. School heads’ leadership behavior is significantly related to teachers’ work engagement and performance. Teacher’s sex and educational qualification are significantly related to their work engagement while teachers’ performance is significantly related to their civil status and educational qualification. Educational qualification was found to be consistently related to teachers’ work engagement and performance.