Event Title

Choice Architecture: Using “Nudge Theory” to Increase Productivity and Decrease Procrastination in Arts and Design Students, A Case Study

Session

Integrated Design

Description

This paper investigates the educational methods used in teaching arts and design at the university level in Kosovo. It investigates several practices and expectations of the students as they relate to practices in Kosovo. Historically, as is common with many educational systems from the former Eastern block, the students follow lectures and then they undergo various examinations to be graded. What is peculiar, and different from the other educational systems, such as the one in the United States, is that the students have the ability to re-take the exam during different exam terms. Our paper argues that this approach increases procrastination and stifles learning. As a solution, we recommend the abolishment of this system and switching to one more in line with the U.S. practice, where if a student fails a class they can repeat it the next semester from the beginning (rather than indefinitely postponing taking the exams). Furthermore, we propose a switch from an exam-based system towards a discussion and project-based coursework. Our rationale is based on the concepts of “choice architecture” and “nudge theory” — restricting options or significantly changing incentives — through which we aim to incentivize the students towards completing their coursework on time. In simple words, we propose removing choice in order to change behavior. We argue that this practice would not only make the students work harder, increase their productivity, instill healthy time-management skills, increase their soft skills, but also make them better students and professionals in their respective fields.

Keywords:

art, design, education, students, behavioral sciences, behavioral economics, nudge theory, choice architecture theory, restricting options, changing incentives, education methods, exam terms.

Proceedings Editor

Edmond Hajrizi

ISBN

978-9951-550-47-5

First Page

1

Location

UBT Kampus, Lipjan

Start Date

30-10-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

30-10-2021 12:00 AM

DOI

10.33107/ubt-ic.2021.117

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Oct 30th, 12:00 AM Oct 30th, 12:00 AM

Choice Architecture: Using “Nudge Theory” to Increase Productivity and Decrease Procrastination in Arts and Design Students, A Case Study

UBT Kampus, Lipjan

This paper investigates the educational methods used in teaching arts and design at the university level in Kosovo. It investigates several practices and expectations of the students as they relate to practices in Kosovo. Historically, as is common with many educational systems from the former Eastern block, the students follow lectures and then they undergo various examinations to be graded. What is peculiar, and different from the other educational systems, such as the one in the United States, is that the students have the ability to re-take the exam during different exam terms. Our paper argues that this approach increases procrastination and stifles learning. As a solution, we recommend the abolishment of this system and switching to one more in line with the U.S. practice, where if a student fails a class they can repeat it the next semester from the beginning (rather than indefinitely postponing taking the exams). Furthermore, we propose a switch from an exam-based system towards a discussion and project-based coursework. Our rationale is based on the concepts of “choice architecture” and “nudge theory” — restricting options or significantly changing incentives — through which we aim to incentivize the students towards completing their coursework on time. In simple words, we propose removing choice in order to change behavior. We argue that this practice would not only make the students work harder, increase their productivity, instill healthy time-management skills, increase their soft skills, but also make them better students and professionals in their respective fields.