Event Title

Will Artificial Intelligence demand Education to produce higher thinking citizens?

Presenter Information

Roy Andersen

Session

Education and Development

Description

It is common to hear people talking about the Fourth Industrial Revolution. There is, however, no Fourth Industrial Revolution. There was one industrial revolution from 1750 to 1950. This was followed by the technological era, then in the 1980s the computer era. We have moved from this into the era of artificial intelligence or AI. As AI machines threaten to take jobs from people, we hear comments that new jobs will be created. Yet, what too few understand is that AI has pulled us into the Nano era. While the word “nano” is a trade name for a wide variety of items, the very dramatic changes that nanotechnology could bring to our civilisation may shatter our whole concept of what work means and who may be able to obtain it. Of concern to us all should be in how a high unemployment level worldwide would disrupt the harmony of each society, as its members develop dissatisfaction in their lives and then resentment to their society. There follows from this two major concerns: First, the gradual division of a mixed job society into two distinct societies, defined by those having jobs and those having lesser or no jobs. Nano technology has the means to create first and second class citizens with far deeper meanings than we have ever experienced before, where each division will be forced to dwell and permanently remain within their zones restricted from each other and having very different living opportunities. Second, to ensure stability in the society against such disregard for its moral and legal laws, greater levels of internal security and surveillance would be needed. As these develop, they would lead to a general restriction on the freedom of the citizen and so a degeneration of our concept of democracy. This short paper will look at the ways education designs the citizen to be and how a more responsible citizen could be engineered through dynamic changes in the structure of education, which could lessen the surveillance upon them.

Keywords:

Artificial Intelligence, Education, Civilisation, nano

Proceedings Editor

Edmond Hajrizi

ISBN

978-9951-550-47-5

Location

UBT Kampus, Lipjan

Start Date

30-10-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

30-10-2021 12:00 AM

DOI

10.33107/ubt-ic.2021.458

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Oct 30th, 12:00 AM Oct 30th, 12:00 AM

Will Artificial Intelligence demand Education to produce higher thinking citizens?

UBT Kampus, Lipjan

It is common to hear people talking about the Fourth Industrial Revolution. There is, however, no Fourth Industrial Revolution. There was one industrial revolution from 1750 to 1950. This was followed by the technological era, then in the 1980s the computer era. We have moved from this into the era of artificial intelligence or AI. As AI machines threaten to take jobs from people, we hear comments that new jobs will be created. Yet, what too few understand is that AI has pulled us into the Nano era. While the word “nano” is a trade name for a wide variety of items, the very dramatic changes that nanotechnology could bring to our civilisation may shatter our whole concept of what work means and who may be able to obtain it. Of concern to us all should be in how a high unemployment level worldwide would disrupt the harmony of each society, as its members develop dissatisfaction in their lives and then resentment to their society. There follows from this two major concerns: First, the gradual division of a mixed job society into two distinct societies, defined by those having jobs and those having lesser or no jobs. Nano technology has the means to create first and second class citizens with far deeper meanings than we have ever experienced before, where each division will be forced to dwell and permanently remain within their zones restricted from each other and having very different living opportunities. Second, to ensure stability in the society against such disregard for its moral and legal laws, greater levels of internal security and surveillance would be needed. As these develop, they would lead to a general restriction on the freedom of the citizen and so a degeneration of our concept of democracy. This short paper will look at the ways education designs the citizen to be and how a more responsible citizen could be engineered through dynamic changes in the structure of education, which could lessen the surveillance upon them.