Event Title

EU security response to the Syrian conflict

Session

Security Studies

Description

The European Union is not only a large single market, it is also a common external action. This includes foreign affairs, security, defense, international trade, neighborhood policy, as well as development cooperation and humanitarian aid. However, in joint security and foreign policy, highly sovereign issues, the member states have maintained as much as possible distinct national policies. The Treaty of Lisbon entered into force, in December 2009, has been considered as significant effort to ensure better cooperation and consistency in EU foreign and security policy, but, its overall international position remains weak and other powers increasingly challenge European Union’ capacity to maintain their role and to defend their interests and values in a multipolar world of geopolitical competition. The aim of this paper is to argue, that the Syrian conflict is one more proof that foreign and security policy of EU remained strangely passive and in discrepancy with its ambition for active international engagement and has shown that the EU’s degree of strategic autonomy in the current international order is ultimately limited.

Keywords:

EU, Policy, security, foreign, conflict, national, international

Proceedings Editor

Edmond Hajrizi

ISBN

978-9951-550-47-5

Location

UBT Kampus, Lipjan

Start Date

30-10-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

30-10-2021 12:00 AM

DOI

10.33107/ubt-ic.2021.132

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Oct 30th, 12:00 AM Oct 30th, 12:00 AM

EU security response to the Syrian conflict

UBT Kampus, Lipjan

The European Union is not only a large single market, it is also a common external action. This includes foreign affairs, security, defense, international trade, neighborhood policy, as well as development cooperation and humanitarian aid. However, in joint security and foreign policy, highly sovereign issues, the member states have maintained as much as possible distinct national policies. The Treaty of Lisbon entered into force, in December 2009, has been considered as significant effort to ensure better cooperation and consistency in EU foreign and security policy, but, its overall international position remains weak and other powers increasingly challenge European Union’ capacity to maintain their role and to defend their interests and values in a multipolar world of geopolitical competition. The aim of this paper is to argue, that the Syrian conflict is one more proof that foreign and security policy of EU remained strangely passive and in discrepancy with its ambition for active international engagement and has shown that the EU’s degree of strategic autonomy in the current international order is ultimately limited.