Event Title

Striving for a Social-Democratic Architecture

Session

Integrated Design

Description

Construction projects are omnipresent in Prishtina. It’s difficult to walk in the city for more than a few minutes without passing new, modern apartment blocks or construction sites with

billboards promising luxurious living spaces to come. Architecture, during all the greatest creative periods, has been the mother of all arts — it has been a social art. In the historical golden ages, architects were “headmasters” who played the main role in the entire production process. However, in the transition from the age of craftsmanship to the industrial age, architects have lost their position of governance. Today, architects are not the “headmasters,” but are instead in danger of losing their position to engineers, scientists and constructors if they don’t change their approach and focus on the new situation. The architects of the future will need to express the spiritual as well as material needs of human life through their work. They will need to act as coordinators and organizers of an extensive experience, starting from the social concepts of life and the successful integration of thought and feeling, by bringing purpose and form into spatial harmony.

Keywords:

construction, spatial

Session Chair

Ajhan Bajmaku, Artrit Bytyçi

Proceedings Editor

Edmond Hajrizi

ISBN

978-9951-550-19-2

Location

Pristina, Kosovo

Start Date

26-10-2019 11:00 AM

End Date

26-10-2019 12:30 PM

DOI

10.33107/ubt-ic.2019.11

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Oct 26th, 11:00 AM Oct 26th, 12:30 PM

Striving for a Social-Democratic Architecture

Pristina, Kosovo

Construction projects are omnipresent in Prishtina. It’s difficult to walk in the city for more than a few minutes without passing new, modern apartment blocks or construction sites with

billboards promising luxurious living spaces to come. Architecture, during all the greatest creative periods, has been the mother of all arts — it has been a social art. In the historical golden ages, architects were “headmasters” who played the main role in the entire production process. However, in the transition from the age of craftsmanship to the industrial age, architects have lost their position of governance. Today, architects are not the “headmasters,” but are instead in danger of losing their position to engineers, scientists and constructors if they don’t change their approach and focus on the new situation. The architects of the future will need to express the spiritual as well as material needs of human life through their work. They will need to act as coordinators and organizers of an extensive experience, starting from the social concepts of life and the successful integration of thought and feeling, by bringing purpose and form into spatial harmony.