Event Title

You can go your own way: How transit-country migration attitudes are influenced by European Union ideals

Session

Political Science

Description

Balkan countries aspiring to membership in the European Union (EU) typically provide the region with soft border control, housing or repulsing migrants who had hoped to reach Western Europe. These policies can be unpopular domestically, especially compared to the third option of ignoring migrants and letting them travel on their way. To justify providing such migration management, transit-country governments attribute their policy choices to a combination of European values and mandates imposed by European organizations. Do their constituents respond to such externalized attributions of responsibility? Relying on cellphone samples collected using random digit dialing (RDD) in Albania and Kosovo during winter 2018-19, we test whether reminding respondents of EU expectations actually sways transit-country public opinion. We find that an EU-oriented framing does increase Balkan support for pro-refugee policies somewhat, but does not necessarily increase the relative willingness to house the migrants. If anything, an EU message sympathetic toward refugees can increase the temptation to let migrants travel on their way, accentuating the oft-noted underlying tension between perceived European security interests and the EU’s publicized ideals.

Proceedings Editor

Edmond Hajrizi

ISBN

978-9951-550-47-5

Location

UBT Kampus, Lipjan

Start Date

30-10-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

30-10-2021 12:00 AM

DOI

10.33107/ubt-ic.2021.245

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Oct 30th, 12:00 AM Oct 30th, 12:00 AM

You can go your own way: How transit-country migration attitudes are influenced by European Union ideals

UBT Kampus, Lipjan

Balkan countries aspiring to membership in the European Union (EU) typically provide the region with soft border control, housing or repulsing migrants who had hoped to reach Western Europe. These policies can be unpopular domestically, especially compared to the third option of ignoring migrants and letting them travel on their way. To justify providing such migration management, transit-country governments attribute their policy choices to a combination of European values and mandates imposed by European organizations. Do their constituents respond to such externalized attributions of responsibility? Relying on cellphone samples collected using random digit dialing (RDD) in Albania and Kosovo during winter 2018-19, we test whether reminding respondents of EU expectations actually sways transit-country public opinion. We find that an EU-oriented framing does increase Balkan support for pro-refugee policies somewhat, but does not necessarily increase the relative willingness to house the migrants. If anything, an EU message sympathetic toward refugees can increase the temptation to let migrants travel on their way, accentuating the oft-noted underlying tension between perceived European security interests and the EU’s publicized ideals.