Event Title

Cynicism: transgression and counterculture in the production of contemporary urban-architectural territories

Session

Architecture and Spatial Planning

Description

The contemporary urban-architectural space has been marked by two parallel operations; on one hand, control: prototypes of a preserved and reconstructed city, ideal and precious. On the other, cynicism: overcrowded countercultures that eliminate disciplinary boundaries and mock at the professional practice of urbanism and architecture. This characteristic threshold-territory of the postmodern city houses expressions that modernism could not and did not want to include in its rational discourse, and that have their origin in cynicism, which in practice determines the use and consumption, transformation and transvaluation of the real urban-architectural territory through experimentation.

Historically through the suppression of borders, cynicism opposed Platonism and rationalism, pillars of the normalization of Western thought; as a consequence and resistance, postmodernity will claim cynicism in countercultures that choose ideological and spatial transgression as a way of life and expresses particular phenomena for which there is not yet an explanatory theory, and although cynicism is not a theory but a pragmatism proposed as a philosophy of freedom, transgression, and suppression of limits, there is no other ideological stance that more accurately explains the conditions of the production of space in the 21st century.

This lecture describes a theoretical proposal that reconfigures the way of thinking and using urban-architectural territories, is product of a doctoral research on the countercultural forms of mobility and transgression in the City of Mexico, which questions the conventional ways of using the public and architectural space. It is based on the studies of the cynicism by Foucault and Sloterdijk, the visions of resistance of Becker and Onfray, and the philosophical-spatial models applied to the city of Deleuze and Koolhaas. The postmodern cynicism (kynicism) is claimed as a creative strategy to reconfigure and produce contemporary urban-architectural territories.

Keywords:

cynicism, urban-architectural space, postmodern philosophy, kynicism

Session Chair

Binak Beqaj

Session Co-Chair

Elvida Pallaska

Proceedings Editor

Edmond Hajrizi

ISBN

978-9951-550-19-2

Location

Pristina, Kosovo

Start Date

26-10-2019 11:00 AM

End Date

26-10-2019 12:30 PM

DOI

10.33107/ubt-ic.2019.226

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Oct 26th, 11:00 AM Oct 26th, 12:30 PM

Cynicism: transgression and counterculture in the production of contemporary urban-architectural territories

Pristina, Kosovo

The contemporary urban-architectural space has been marked by two parallel operations; on one hand, control: prototypes of a preserved and reconstructed city, ideal and precious. On the other, cynicism: overcrowded countercultures that eliminate disciplinary boundaries and mock at the professional practice of urbanism and architecture. This characteristic threshold-territory of the postmodern city houses expressions that modernism could not and did not want to include in its rational discourse, and that have their origin in cynicism, which in practice determines the use and consumption, transformation and transvaluation of the real urban-architectural territory through experimentation.

Historically through the suppression of borders, cynicism opposed Platonism and rationalism, pillars of the normalization of Western thought; as a consequence and resistance, postmodernity will claim cynicism in countercultures that choose ideological and spatial transgression as a way of life and expresses particular phenomena for which there is not yet an explanatory theory, and although cynicism is not a theory but a pragmatism proposed as a philosophy of freedom, transgression, and suppression of limits, there is no other ideological stance that more accurately explains the conditions of the production of space in the 21st century.

This lecture describes a theoretical proposal that reconfigures the way of thinking and using urban-architectural territories, is product of a doctoral research on the countercultural forms of mobility and transgression in the City of Mexico, which questions the conventional ways of using the public and architectural space. It is based on the studies of the cynicism by Foucault and Sloterdijk, the visions of resistance of Becker and Onfray, and the philosophical-spatial models applied to the city of Deleuze and Koolhaas. The postmodern cynicism (kynicism) is claimed as a creative strategy to reconfigure and produce contemporary urban-architectural territories.